Global Analysis from the European Perspective. Preparing for the world of tomorrow




Surgeons of our minds

A piece of stats news has been broken in Poland that the number of surgeons has dropped by a quarter (one fourth, twenty-five percent) as compared to 2006. Within thirteen years. Make a guess: what happened? How did that large number of doctors disappear? Young people stopped being interested in medical studies? No. Make another guess. The demand for surgery is much smaller since society at large is healthier and healthier courtesy of the salutary regulations and decrees of the European Union? No. Make yet another guess. The surgeons emigrated to Western countries? Spot on! Bingo!

The Western intellectual circles regard it as evil to exploit weaker nations, especially the Third World countries. They love calling such behaviour fascism (a very fashionable offensive appellation) or racism or what not. Occupying moral high ground, they applaud sending doctors to Somalia or Nigeria or Bangladesh. Yet somewhat miraculously this principle does not apply when physicians from Eastern Europe keep coming to the Western states, draining East European health care systems. Why shouldn’t they after all? We need them – say Western intellectuals – our societies are growing older, there must be someone willing to take care of them.

How do the Western intellectuals reconcile their indignation at exploiting poorer (Third World) countries with depriving Eastern Europeans of their doctors? Oh, come on, another lofty principle is made use of: human rights, among which the freedom of movement is especially enshrined. So the story goes that “we do not rob the poorer countries of their doctors (engineers, teachers, professionals of any kind): they merely use their human rights and flock to places where they have better economic conditions.”

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Stealth War Conventional and unconventional war(fare)

Manifesting itself through clubs or stones, bows or chariots, musketeers or cannon, tanks or aircraft, chemical or nuclear weapons, war has always been with us and will always remain. The history of mankind is a sine wave where peaks and troughs are periods of peace and war: the usual human activity determined by conflicting interests.
All the elements of warfare have always been present though some of its facets are more pronounced now than ever before. Since in the modern age hot war means enormous material wipeout and a huge loss of human life coupled with assured mutual destruction, modern war is waged more with economic, IT and especially propaganda means. An aggressor does not necessarily need brute force to subdue the will of his opponent: a modern aggressor may resort to a whole gamut of weaponry such as psychological operations, stock exchange speculations, colour revolutions, coups d’état, human-rights movements, geopolitical vacuums, international treaties, (seemingly) non-governmental
organizations, supranational corporations, international awards and all other conceivable instruments that are at the aggressor’s disposal to bring a political, moral or economic pressure to bear on the aggressor’s target state. This modern warfare goes by different names of which hybrid warfare, stealth war or intangible war are the most frequently used. The October issue of Gefira presents the theory and practice of this kind of international conflict. Read more

Gefira Financial Bulletin #37 is available now

  • Preparation for stealth war and its arsenal
  • The dynamism of the economic destruction of a target country
  • Formation of civil resistance
  • The Europeans are destroying their energy security
  • Oil and gas companies are a great investment with a risk

Populism vs Mobilization

Populations grow despite the best efforts of abortionists. Even a cursory look reveals that abortions routinely only take place in high income countries. Populism occurs where people express its dissenting voice i.e. vox populi and mobilization is where the underclass is organized to dissent (protest) against its elites.

From an elitist point of view the age-old question is always how to manage the underclasses. It can be compared to a CEO managing the company night watchman or an African King his herdsman. In an organized structure these managerial techniques are generally successful because the manager is ahead of the curve, while with respect to populism or mobilization, it is behind the curve.

Generally speaking a company manager is subtly reminded on a daily basis of the performance of low level employees and the same holds good for the African King. When referring to “elites”, it becomes obvious (by their very actions) that they are so far removed from reality that all control is essentially lost. The elitist lifestyle becomes decadent to the extent that they don’t care what their underclasses do and are always surprised by those “deplorable populists” and their mobilization.

The reaction of the elites to these “uprisings” differ with respect to whether it is populist or mobilized. In high-income America they become viciously anti-populists while in communist China they exert MORE control.

Violence against high-income country populists is also visible in Francewhile almost no action is taken in low-income (communist) South Africa against xenophobiawhere the elitesare also attempting to improve measures of control (such as to reduce unproductive protests against municipal service deliveries).

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A Citizen’s Snapshot of South Africa, September 2019

Despite being a second-class citizen in South Africa,I may still express my opinionin a country that has declared itself a democracy.This article is therefore written in the context of “Fair-Discrimination”meaning that I am not allowed to discriminate against any person of colour, but that any person of colour may discriminate against me for the content of this (white) article (even if it is published in a different country – in which case I should use a pseudonym).

South Africa, a country with roughly the size of Texas and a population of less than 60 million people, has 9 provinces and eleven official languages. There are two main cities, one of which is Cape Town – the seat of parliament, and Pretoria – the seat of the government and home to the diplomatic corps. Besides, Johannesburg is the business and Durban the harbour city. Cape Town is also home to hi-tech because of the juncture of undersea cable connections and a preferred destination for royal elites who are attracted by its mild Mediterranean climate. Unfortunately though, Cape Town is also the world’s murder capital. That this would affect the economy is no surprise.
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Song Hongbing’s “Currency Wars” – a review

A revolutionary book from China, where it became a bestseller and is hushed up in Europe for (un)known reasons

Did you know that the FED is actually a private bank and still has the right to issue dollars? Did you know that for over 200 years private bankers have been controlling inflation and deflation, causing crises and even determining world history? Or do you really believe that history is a chaotic process, a melting pot of coincidences, independent decisions by politicians, insane ideologies and carefully planned strategies? Consider the crises in South Korea (1997), Argentina (1998-2002), Greece (2009) and many others in modern world history. Who did the citizens of the affected countries blame for the crisis? Not only their government, but also the international bankers, for whom the governments of the countries affected by the crisis were only a springboard. Would you like to know how these bankers manage to be so powerful and control demand for money almost everywhere in the world and thus control societies? It’s not that complicated and you don’t have to know anything about the economy: just read “Currency Wars” by Song Hongbing.

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Gefira-Bulletin #36 China: Political and historical overview

The holidays are over, so to compensate for that we are taking our readers on an exotic journey to China. The unipolar world is making place for a di- or multipolar one. The Soviet Union is gone, but the Russian military might is not; the United States is the world’s largest economy, but China is pretty close behind and the gap is narrowing with every year. The BRICS initiative may have failed, but the cooperation between Beijing and Moscow poses a challenge that Washington cannot denounce as insignificant. Especially the attempt to dedollarize the international trade. Politicians and analysts are increasingly talking about the Thucydides trap, which is a theory about a ruling and rising powers. The power that is threatened with being dislodged from its dominant position has no choice but to respond. The response may take the form of a relatively mild commercial or diplomatic clash with the aspiring state, failing which it can easily evolve into war. History knows very many instances of struggles between ruling and challenging powers with most ending in a bloodshed. Time will show.

Gefira Financial Bulletin #36 is available now

  • Negative interest rates and the flow of money
  • China sets its sights on gold
  • The largest army of pensioners in the world is emerging in China

Which is not to say that China has no problems of her own. It has its economic and democratic setbacks. The Middle Kingdom has still a lot of catching-up to do when the country’s economic output and development is compared to that of the West, while the one-child policy that was in force for decades translates into a significant shrinkage of labour and a huge wave of pensioners who will have to be provided for. Still, the Chinese are focused on success. Discipline, social cohesiveness, high moral standards, efficient, centralized decision-making, a vision for the future and the ambition shared by the government and the governed to make the nation great are sure passports to an equally great future. Courses of Chinese are offered around the globe, not excepting Eastern Europe, and they are offered not merely to businessmen but also to children. This one fact speaks volumes and we describe many others in the current bulletin.

The tanker war is coming to a head

Attacks on Saudi oil production facilities last Saturday are a response to the Saudis’ ongoing military campaign in Yemen, said the spokesman for “God’s helpers” (Huthi’s word). Trump says US weapons are primed and loaded. God with us, he should have added. He blames Satan for everything in Iran. Iran (the guardian of the true faith) claims to have nothing to do with the events. Where does the truth lie? Somewhere else. Would the Huthis without Iran’s aid be able to use ten super modern combat drones so effectively as to halve Saudi oil production within one night? Does Trump really want to go to war after he has recently released all the hawks from his administration (like Bolton)? Do we want to trust Iranian, American or Yemeni propaganda? No, we are trying to be objective in our presentation of the facts and in our analysis. As early as 2018 and in June of this year, we drew our readers’ attention to a possible new tanker war in the Gulf Unfortunately, the latest facts show that our scenario will come true: Trump tries by all means to support oil production in the US by have it reduced in the rest of the world. He is killing two birds with one stone, because at the same time he shows himself to be a strong leader before the elections, who is hard on his enemies. The war in Yemen is also an example of a hybrid war, which we will address in the October issue of our Bulletin.

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Gefira-Bulletin #37

Manifesting itself through clubs or stones, bows or chariots, musketeers or cannon, tanks or aircraft, chemical or nuclear weapons, war has always been with us and will always remain. The history of mankind is a sine wave where peaks and troughs are periods of peace and war: the usual human activity determined by conflicting interests. All the elements of warfare have always been present though some of its facets are more pronounced now than ever before. Since in the modern age hot war means enormous material wipeout and a huge loss of human life coupled with assured mutual destruction, modern war is waged more with economic, IT and especially propaganda means. An aggressor does not necessarily need brute force to subdue the will of his opponent: a modern aggressor may resort to a whole gamut of weaponry such as psychological operations, stock exchange speculations, colour revolutions, coups d’état, human-rights movements, geopolitical vacuums, international treaties, (seemingly) non-governmental organizations, supranational corporations, international awards and all other conceivable instruments that are at the aggressor’s disposal to bring a political, moral or economic pressure to bear on the aggressor’s target state. This modern warfare goes by different names of which hybrid warfare, stealth war or intangible war are the most frequently used. The October issue of Gefira presents the theory and practice of this kind of international conflict.

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War is a human, social activity just like trade or culture. Individuals, entities – groups of whatever type – have conflicting ideological, social, economic interests which clash in a variety of ways causing conflict, of which war is the ultimate expression and takes a whole gamut of forms. These morph one into another, very often imperceptibly, which has been succinctly encapsulated in the phrase that war is the continuation of politics by other means. If that is so, then it might be reverted to saying that politics is the continuation of war. Politics, too, is a human, social activity.

Gefira-Bulletin #36

It all began with relocating American and generally Western industry to China. Westernbusinessmen could not believe their luck: China, the largest market in the world,was there for them to reap handsome profit from; China, the largest reservoir of cheaplabour was there for them to exploit. Little thought seems to have been given to Americannational security. The Middle Kingdom, however, had its own agenda. It aimed atusing Western technologies to elevate itself and strengthen its international position.With the Soviet Union gone, China has gradually emerged as Washington’s new contestant.Before the Americans noticed that some of the best of their technology havebeen transferred to or stolen by the Chinese, before they noticed that by outsourcingmanufacture to this Asian tiger they have impoverished and numerically diminishedtheir middle class, within three or so decades the Middle Kingdom became the world’ssecond largest economy. When eventually the American elites woke up to the problem,it was so aggravated that only a trade and financial war appeared to be the availableoption.

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As of now, China is being depicted as almost a rogue state, which is acting inbad faith in economic and financial dealings (the Huawei affair, the G5 technology) andviolating the human rights. Alleged Chinese involvement in the trafficking of humanorgans tops the list of accusations. How much of it is true remains to be seen. One thingis certain: when war breaks out – and we are witnessing the diplomatic and economicstruggle between the two powers – truth is its first victim.
 
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